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Monthly Archives: March 2016

CHANGING CHILDREN’S SURNAMES

Name Tag

In many cultures, a child’s surname has a significant symbolic value attached to it. A surname serves to mark our heritage, our religion, and, perhaps most importantly, our family origins. On this note, when a child is born in Georgia, if the child’s paternity is known, the father’s surname is given to the child.

The practice of giving a child the surname of his or her father predates our nation and stretches back centuries; however, this rule is not absolute, given situations in which a child is exclusively raised by their mother, or the father is not involved in the child’s life.

In these cases, the custodial parent may wish to change the child’s surname. As such, Georgia law recognizes three scenarios under which a child’s surname may be changed, dependent on whether the child was born in or out of wedlock, or if the name change is being exercised by consent of one of the parents.

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SELF-INFLICTED REDUCED EARNING CAPACITY & SUPPORT/ALIMONY OBLIGATIONS

Alimony

The economic recession that was triggered in 2007-2008 took a heavy toll on the economy and still continues to have an impact today. Despite the wide-ranging financial impact, many American workers were able to weather the storm with little disruption to their earning capacity or job security. However, the economic downturn also has provided ill-intentioned individuals to attempt to avoid or modify their support or alimony obligations either through intentionally working a job below the obligor’s skill set so as to reduce income earned thereby reducing the support obligation. In more extreme cases an obligor may claim that they are unable to find a job due to economic conditions, in a veiled attempt to avoid support obligations.

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